Auto Mechanic’s Tip – How to Locate Driveline Vibrations

Whether you drive a lot or a little, driveline vibration can be an irritating problem to deal with. For most auto mechanics, the most compelling challenge is to find the vibration’s point of origin. It’s usually a task that requires firsthand knowledge of a vehicle’s driveline components.

Your vehicle’s wheels, tires, axles, transmission, driveshaft, clutch or torque converter, along with engine parts, rotate at a high rate of speed. Any one of these components can be worn or out of spec and be the source of your vehicle’s vibration troubles.

The first step in diagnosing the origin of the vibration is to try and determine the exact conditions under which the vibration occurs. There are three basic types of vibration to be on the lookout for.

Engine Related (RPM) Vibration

RPM-related vibrations will most likely occur when your car is placed in all gears, and is quite often attributed to the engine or any other engine components that turn at the same speed. The harmonic balancer, flexplate and transmission input shaft are several components to consider. If you are scoping the cause, and the vibration changes or disappears as speed is increased, you can eliminate RPM as the problem.

Speed-Related Vibration

A vibration related to vehicle speed will usually manifest when you’ve reached a certain speed and worsen if the vehicle’s speed increases. Several possible sources might be the wheels, universal joints, axles or transmission output shaft. You can narrow down the problem further by maintaining the same speed and shifting into a different gear. If the vibration goes away, you’ll know that speed is not the cause.

Acceleration/Deceleration-Related Vibration

If the vehicle vibration changes, whether you are accelerating, decelerating or maintaining a steady cruise speed, there could be numerous causes. Just keep in mind that your vehicle …

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The Military and Truck, Transport and Auto Careers

The military is a big employer when it comes to things with wheels. From truck drivers to heavy equipment mechanics and everything in between, modern governments spend millions or even billion in keeping their forces mobile.

The Vehicles

Armoured personnel carriers, transport trucks, tanks, jeeps, ATVs, construction equipment and even motorcycles and regular cars have a place in the military. Some of these have a purely combative purpose, while others are part of daily operations. High ranking generals will be chauffeured in staff cars, while military bases will keep motor operated heavy machinery around for everything from clearing snow to military research. Some vehicles serve primarily to tow artillery pieces around, and some are even antiques. All these need in house specialists with auto technician training to maintain them and dispatcher training to see them moved around from point A to point B.

Supplies

It was Napoleon who was quoted as saying an army moves on its stomach, and when it comes to keeping troops supplied, that much hasn’t changed. As a part of home defence, most countries rely more on road than rail, ship or air. The military supplies its employees with everything they need from housing to work clothing and all this needs to be moved around according to the current demands. A quartermaster is the role that oversees inventory of goods, and these days they may have some transport operations training.

Life on base means a regular influx of food and notions, the later to be distributed out of the canteen. Munitions and weapons also need to be moved around. Some of this is obviously going to come from civilian contractors as the military does not keep its own farms and garment manufacturers, but once it is initially delivered, it’s up to the organization to …

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